T2/T3 Pilot and Seed Funded Research

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T2/T3 'bottom-up' research Awarded in 2016

 

 

T2/T3 'bottom-up' research Awarded in 2015

 

  • An integrated rehabilitation program utilising telehealth for patients undergoing surgical treatment for non-small cell lung cancer. CIA:Tim Shaw.
  • Synoptic structured multidisciplinary team lung cancer reporting: a novel pilot project designed to harness point-of-care data to improve lung cancer outcomes. CIA: Emily Stone, St Vincent's Hospital.

 

T2/T3 'bottom-up' research Awarded in 2014

 

  • Does knowledge of personal genetic risk of melanoma motivate behaviour change? A pilot randomised controlled trial. CIA: Anne Cust, The Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research group of the University of Sydney
  • Interventions to promote timely referral to palliative care services. CIA: Jane Phillips, St Vincent's Hospital.

 

T2/T3 'bottom-up' research Awarded in 2013

 

  • Test‐E: Development and phase I testing of a web‐based intervention to reduce anxiety and depression in survivors of testicular cancer. CIA: Phyllis Butow, Centre for Medical Psychology & Evidence-based Decision-making 

 

T2/T3 'bottom-up' research Awarded in 2012

 

  • Translating evidence into practice: implementing clinical pathways to relieve psychological distress and improve wellbeing for cancer patients. Read more
  • Quantifying evidence‐practice gaps in clinical follow‐up for people with rectal cancer in NSW; a population‐based study. Read more
  • 'Should I take low dose aspirin?' Development of the 'Optimise' decision aid for cancer chemoprophylaxis. More information coming soon

 

 

 

Phyllis 200pxwProject title: Translating evidence into practice: implementing clinical pathways to relieve psychological distress and improve wellbeing for cancer patients

 

Interview with CI Phyllis Butow

NHMRC Senior Principle Research Fellow and Co‐Director, Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence‐based Decision‐making (CeMPED), The University of Sydney

 

T1/T2 or T2/T3?

This project falls into the Sydney Catalyst T2/T3 category; translational research on implementing evidence into routine clinical practice

Funding: $50,000 over one year pilot and seed funding (2012 round)

Project summary:

Sydney Catalyst is funding phase 1 of a three phase project to improve detection and management of psychosocial distress in cancer patients. The project builds upon studies which have demonstrated that touch-screen computer screening for distress in cancer patients (QUICATOUCH) is feasible and acceptable and that compliance rates are high.

Phase 1 aims to remove a barrier to uptake through finalising clear clinical pathways (through consensus-based stakeholder review), and adding audit and staff training. Environmental scanning and mapping of clinical processes will be conducted using Dubbo Base and RPA hospitals as case studies and it is envisaged that collaboratives of 'clinical champions' that will drive change in each institution will be established.

At the conclusion of phase 1 funding will be sought for phase 2 to pilot and evaluate tailored implementation of the clinical pathways developed in Phase 1 (at Dubbo Base and RPA). Phase 3 will be a multi-site randomised controlled trial of the pathways, with 14 NSW treatment centres already having agreed to take part.

What was the catalyst to you researching this topic right now?

Routine screening for anxiety and depression have recently been endorsed by a number of major international bodies, including UICC (International Union against Cancer) and IPOS (International Psycho-Oncology Society). Yet evidence for patient impact of screening is still lacking, and uptake is still poor. We need to understand more about the barriers to uptake, and ensure these are minimised so as to enable implementation of routine screening and a true test of its efficacy.

How will the funding from Sydney Catalyst mainly be used?

Funding from Sydney Catalyst is vital to allow these preliminary steps to be undertaken, increasing our chances of successfully attracting research funding to undertake a definitive study, and eventual uptake in routine clinical practice. The research officer will be collating already conducted reviews of guidelines and clinical pathways for managing anxiety and depression in cancer patients, as well as feedback on these gathered during a workshop at COSA last year. The RO will develop draft Australian guidelines, and liaise with a large multidisciplinary reference group of clinicians to obtain consensus on the pathways using a Delphi process of consecutive rounds of review. They will then liaise with Oncology staff at RPAH and Dubbo to enable observation of staff processes of a number of key cases to as to better understand potential enablers and barriers to routine screening for anxiety and depression at those sites. They will also interview key staff at those sites to obtain their views about this process, and establish a team of committed clinical champions.  

Why will this investigation be important in the field of translational research?

Yes, we believe that careful mapping of enablers and barriers to ensure implementation of optimal clinical care is relevant, useful and non-obstructive, is essential for effective translation of evidence

This project involves:
The Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-based Decision-making (CeMPED);
Dubbo Base and Royal Prince Alfred (RPA) Hospitals;
The Workforce Education & Development Group (WEDG);
Sydney Medical School;
The Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG); and
The NSW "Improving Palliative Care Through Clinical Trials" palliative care clinical trials collaborative (ImPaCCT).

 

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Jane Young 200pxwProject title: Quantifying evidence-practice gaps in clinical follow up for people with rectal cancer in NSW: population-based study

 

Interview with CI Jane Young

Professor in Cancer Epidemiology, University of Sydney; Head, Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR), Sydney School of Public Health; Executive Director, Surgical Outcomes Research Centre (SOuRCe); Scientific Director Cancer Institute NSW (non executive, advisory role)

T1/T2 or T2/T3?

This project falls into the Sydney Catalyst T2/T3 category; translational research on implementing evidence into routine clinical practice

Funding: $50,079 over one year pilot and seed funding (2012 round)

Project summary:

Sydney Catalyst will be funding the first step in a major research program on the surveillance and management of rectal cancer recurrence across NSW. Research shows 50% of people treated for colorectal cancer will develop local or distally recurrent disease and approximately 1/3 will die. National clinical practice guidelines for surveillance colonoscopy introduced in 2011 included a specific recommendation that a colonoscopy should be performed by one year after the resection of a sporadic cancer. However, data from the US on similar guidelines and available NSW data suggest that the adoption of these guidelines in NSW is likely highly variable. The aims of this project are to:

1)      Quantify the proportion of patients in New South Wales who receive clinical follow up for rectal cancer in accordance with evidence based (NHMRC) guidelines (ie quantify the extent of the evidence-practice gap)

2)      Identify patient and service related predictors of patients who are less likely to be followed up in accordance with best evidence (ie identify priority groups for future intervention)

The project will build on the existing NSW Bowel Cancer Care Survey (administered at 6 months post-diagnosis) by introducing the NSW Bowel Cancer Care Follow -up Survey at 12 months post-diagnosis. The survey will be developed after conducting a literature review and receiving input from the Study Advisory Group, other clinicians and consumers.

What was the catalyst to you researching this topic right now?

Our previous research has focussed on evidence-based primary treatment for colorectal cancer.  However, much less is currently known about ongoing surveillance and management following initial treatment for this disease.  This study will fill this gap in knowledge, and we hope will lead to improved follow up and early recognition of recurrent disease at a stage when it is amenable to treatment.

How will the funding from Sydney Catalyst mainly be used?

The funding from Sydney Catalyst will allow a project officer to follow up patients in our study 12 months after their diagnosis with rectal cancer.  She will collect data about the follow up that patients have received and their preferences for further follow up, enter this information into a study database and analyse the data to identify the characteristics of people who are least likely to be followed up in accordance with NHMRC guidelines.

Why will this investigation be important in the field of translational research?

This study will provide information about the extent of an evidence-practice gap in the management of people with rectal cancer in NSW, and will highlight groups of patients who are least likely to receive care according to guidelines. This information will be used to develop strategies to reduce the evidence-practice gap, and these strategies will be tested in future randomised trials.

This project involves:
Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research;
Sydney School of Public Health and Surgical Outcomes Research Centre;
The University of Sydney;
Sydney Local Health District;
Coffs Harbour, Dubbo and Orange base hospitals 

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