T2/T3 Scholarship Funded Research

 

450scholarships 

T2/T3 Bottom-up Research Awarded in 2016

 

 

T2/T3 Bottom-up Research Awarded in 2015

 

  • Understanding the Patient Journey to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Lung Cancer in NSW,   Ashanya Malalasekera, Concord Repatriation General Hospital.
  • Big data to real-world evidence: Informing pharmaceutical policy decisions around targeted cancer medicines, Benjamin Daniels, University of Sydney
  • Supporting decision-making about neoadjuvant systemic therapy for breast cancer, Nicholas Zdenkowski,University of Sydney

 

T2/T3 Bottom-up Research Awarded in 2014

 

  • Optimising the quality and completeness of patient-reported outcome components of cancer clinical trials,  Rebecca Mercieca-Bebber, University of Sydney.

 

T2/3 Bottom-up Research Awarded in 2013

 

  • A randomised controlled trial of a psycho-educational intervention for melanoma survivors at high risk of developing new primary disease. Find out more
  • Development of melanoma risk prediction tools for use in general practices, dermatology practices and clinical genetic services. Find out more.

 

The 2012 inaugural round of Sydney Catalyst funding for 1 full PhD award and 5 'Top-up' Research Scholar awards led to support for the following two member-led research initiatives in the T2/T3 research area

 

  • The cost effectiveness of managing individuals at high risk of melanoma in a 'high risk' clinic compared with standard care. Find out more
  • The costs and effectiveness of anti-cancer treatments. Find out more

 

Mbathio DiengMBATHIO DIENG, MIPH M Econ BA Econ, received a 2 year top-up research scholar award for her project titled: A randomised controlled trial of a psycho-educational intervention for melanoma survivors at high risk of developing new primary disease.

Education and work background: Mbathio has a Master of International Public Health degree, including training in epidemiology, biostatistics, and in health economics. She has over 5 years experience working as a research assistant and project coordinator in cancer communication and psycho-oncology research. Relevant to her PhD project, her work experience includes investigating cancer patient information needs and developing and evaluating cancer educational interventions which led to a first-author international journal publication (Dieng et al.Health Expect. 2011 Jul 4).

The PhD will be conducted at and supervised by: Dr Anne Cust at the Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR) group, University of Sydney.

More details: This project builds on an extensive body of research that has led to the development of a psycho-educational booklet that directly addressed the information and supportive care needs of people with melanoma and their families. This booklet has been pilot-tested by a wide range of stakeholders including patients, clinicians, researchers and allied helath professionals. In 2013, we use gold-standard methodology in the form of a randomised controlled trial to test whether the psycho-educational booklet, in conjunction with one-to-one telephone psychological support sessions from a trained clinical psychologist, will reduce fear of melanoma recurrence and new primary melanoma in melanoma survivors, compared to usual care. This is the first study aiming to address fear of cancer recurrence in Australian melanoma patients.

This is important translational research because: This project aims to bridge the gap between existing research evidence demonstrating a critical need for psycho-educational support for melanoma patients, and clinical practice. An important translational aim of this project is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this intervention, which is crucial to implementing this intervention into standard clinical practice. This project addresses the Sydney Catalyst T2/T3 research agenda of implementing evidence into routine clinical practice.

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Kylie Vuong 200pxwKYLIE VUONG, BSc (Med) MBBS (UNSW) MIPH (Syd Uni) FRACGP, received a 2 year top-up research scholar award for her project titled: Development of melanoma risk prediction tools for use in general practices, dermatology practices and clinical genetic services.

 

Education and work background: Kylie is a practicing general practitioner based in Glebe, New South Wales. She completed her medical degrees at The University of New South Wales and did her post graduate training at Westmead Hospital. She is passionate about primary health care and holds a Masters in International Public Health from The University of Sydney.

The PhD will be conducted at and supervised by: Dr Anne Cust at the Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR) group, University of Sydney.

More details: Currently Australian health practitioners are unable to reliably estimate absolute risk of developing melanoma as no melanoma risk prediction tools exist for use in dermatology practices and clinical genetic services, and those previously developed for general practice have limitations and are not routinely used. This project involves development, validation and prospective evaluation of melanoma risk prediction tools for use in general practices, dermatology practices and clinical genetic services. The models will be developed using the Australian Melanoma Family Study (AMFS), a large population-based, case-control-family study of early onset melanoma. Relative risk estimates from the AMFS will be combined with Australian melanoma incidence and mortality data using the Gail method to produce 5-year absolute risk estimates up to age 80 years.

This is important translational research because: This research project will integrate the latest evidence surrounding melanoma risk factors, including genetic biomarkers, into clinically useable tools developed specifically for use in Australian general practices, dermatological practices and genetic services. After internal and external validation, the newly derived tools will be prospectively evaluated in clinical practice.

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CAROLINE WATTS received a 2 year top-up research scholar award (non clinician) for her work titled: 'The cost effectiveness of managing individuals at high risk of melanoma in a 'high risk' clinic compared with standard care'.

Caroline Watts

 

The Sydney Catalyst group where her research is being conducted is the Cancer Epidemiology and Services Research (CESR) group, University of Sydney.

Click on the image to see Caroline describe her work and her ideas about translational cancer research

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DEME KARIKIOS received a 2 year top-up research scholar award (clinician) for his work titled: 'The costs and effectiveness of anti-cancer treatments'. 

 Deme

The Sydney Catalyst group where his research is being conducted is NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney.

Click on the image to see Deme describe his work and his ideas about translational cancer research

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